About

Christina-Marie

Pronounced: kris-TEEN-ə (English), kris-TEE-na (German), kris-TEE-nah (Swedish, Dutch)

 From Christiana, the Latin feminine form of CHRISTIAN. This was the name of an early, possibly legendary, saint who was tormented by her pagan father. It was also borne by a 17th-century Swedish queen and patron the arts who gave up her crown in order to become a Roman Catholic.

Pronounced: MAH-ree (English)

most commonly thought to be the French or Czech version of Mary. Marie can hold many meanings such as “beloved”, “bitter”, “disappointment” and “star of the sea”. The other possible origin of the name is that it was derived from the German name Maria, which is also taken from the name Mary.

Schulz

Pronounced: sh-UU-l-t-s (English)

a common German and Jewish-Ashkenazi family name in Northern Germany. The German word Schulz originates from the local official known as Schultheiß or (Dorf-)Schulz(e), a local law enforcement officer like a police officer, magistrate, bailiff or mayor.

A German status name for a village headman, from a contracted form of Middle High German schultheize. The term originally denoted a man responsible for collecting dues and paying them to the lord of the manor; it is a compound of sculd ‘debt’, ‘due’ + a derivative of heizan ‘to command’.

 

The Abridged Version:

While completing her Liberal Arts degree at Capilano University this year, Christina has held the positions of —

Students’ Union Representative,

Recruitment Ambassador and

Digital Portfolio Mentor.

Christina’s studies have resulted in extensive travel throughout Europe, Asia as well as work as a volunteer in France with an environmental organization. Her travels have contributed to her globally-minded attitude and have provided valuable insight to her interest in receptive design and sustainable urban practices. She came forward as the key student liaison for Capilano University’s Master Plan development and led the university’s first International Model United Nations Conference. In recognition of her achievements she has received the Award for Environmental and Sustainable Achievement, North Shore Women’s Liberal Commission Award, Capilano Students’ Union Engagement Award, the Aaron Bolus Arts Award.

In the evenings and weekends Christina is serving at Vancouver’s newest Japanese fine-dining restaurant, Mak N Ming— which received 4th place as one of Canada’s best new restaurants (and the only Vancouver location on the top 10 list). The boutique-sized Kitsilano restaurant is known for its “small team with big hearts”.

As a fourth-generation Vancouverite, Christina looks forward to contributing to the future, changing landscape of the city. This year she has qualified to become a member of Vancouver’s 30Network, where she works with CityHive and YouthfulCities to increase local civic engagement.

 


 

I am also a huge fan of road cycling. I participate in charity fundraisers every year and look forward to commuting by bike to school and work!

Ride for Refuge, Sep 2017

I have targeted a number of STEM subjects throughout my studies, but I am most interested in the intersections that these fields have with art and society—my most memorable course during my undergrad has been Astronomy ! ( Here, you will find my post of 2017’s pilgrimage to Salem, Oregon’s Total Solar Eclipse.)

I am training myself (with some more-professional guidance) in a number of computer languages and platforms so that I my ideas or interests can have more substance and legibility.

Below, I’ve made an info-graphic to account for my studies at Cap ⇓

 

Degree Breakdown

 

 

 

 

For the patient folks, the long version of my story is found below.


 

“Things of value are never lost” A simple but effective principle I have tried to surrender myself to in my early adult survival. It is an appropriate introduction since my university education, so far, has been an internal battle for adequate value.

A simple but effective principle I have tried to surrender myself to in my early-adult narrative. It is an appropriate introduction since my university education, so far, has been a battle for adequate value.

Born and raised on the North Shore, with a number of relatives that studied at Capilano College, I proved to follow some genealogical labyrinthine for my choice of higher-education. My family spent the year preceding my graduation living abroad (frequently referred to as our “Jack Torrance Period”) as volunteers for an international environmental organization. As caretakers of a 13th-century sanitarium, atop an isolated Alpe of southern France, my interpretation of independence evolved and my North-American-focused attention diffused. Having been granted the privilege to drastically slow-down the typical course of cyclical high-school madness, yet unfortunately eliminating my ability to participate in the International Baccalaureate program, I spent the year developing my capacity to adapt, enforcing new approaches to hands-on learning and traveling to

Jan 2017, My family at Grouse mountain

My family spent the year preceding my graduation living abroad (frequently referred to as our “Jack Torrance Period”, only funny for Kubrick fans) as volunteers for an international environmental organization. Working as caretakers, of a 13th-century sanitarium atop an isolated Alpe of southern France, my interaction with personal independence changed gears, while my North-American-focused attention diffused. Having been granted the privilege to drastically slow-down the typical course of cyclical high-school madness, yet unfortunately eliminating my ability to participate in the International Baccalaureate program, I spent the year developing my capacity to adapt, enforcing new approaches to hands-on learning and traveling to

Our historic residence in France.

Having been granted the privilege to drastically slow-down the course of cyclical urban high-school madness, I, unfortunately, eliminated my ability to participate in the International Baccalaureate program by correspondence. I spent the year developing a greater capacity for adaptation, learned new approaches to “hands-on” skills (military bed corners, herding sheep, maintaining bee hives, you know, the normal stuff), practiced my French-Canadian accent with co-volunteers and locals (I do not advise trying this) and traveling to neighbouring regions.

Harvesting saffron is a grueling task
My family at Les Courmettes

In 2012, a year suspended by controversial Russian presidential elections (launching the infamous Pussy Riots), Kim Jong-un’s installment, a Batman massacre and  Malala Yousafzai’s identifying nightmare, I exhausted my high-school sentence in West Vancouver and arrived at Capilano U for my first semester.

My mother likes to remind me of my affection towards ‘jumping to conclusions’. At this point in time, I would like to agree with her, although I will make my case as to why this is not entirely unfavorable.

The preliminary general studies I acquired during my freshman year at Capilano can be easily classified by the suffix “-ology”.  I weaved my tenacious curiosity through pillars of Social Science introductories. Spelling has never been my forte, and I have had no intention of spending my adult career analyzing microscopic plant particles, so my sophomore slump reigned in an impulsive enrollment into the Business Faculty.

Luckily, I already had years of start-up experience. My father, a born entrepreneur (even managing to sell internet service to paramedics present at his nearly-fatal car accident in the early 2000’s) bread me for marketing; down to the most cost-effective neighbourhood lemonade stands. Countless trade-shows, hours of Excel spreadsheets, and client management kept me busy the first couple years of University.

This business school pursuit allowed me to participate in my first international field school with the University, to mainland China. The trip changed my life. Like most young people, I had a perilous desire to travel, but I had only experienced other anglo-centric destinations. China was a huge shock, stripping me of my previous expectations for the future and broadening my perspective for variance in life. My hunger for Asia erupted, and my appetite for learning augmented. The following year, in 2015,  I had to go back. This time without the familiarity of University staff, but accompanied by a classmate turned long-lost-cousin, who had coincidently shared the previous year’s trip with me.

Paradoxily trying to prevent the “follow in the foot steps”cliché, whilst incarnating the very honest I-am-not-my-parents fable, I decided business was not worth pursuing. I needed to extend my creative drive.  What felt like a self-manifestation, the Liberal Studies program found me.

The interdisciplinary approach in a Liberal Arts education was the ultimate resolution to what I had inherently struggled with in higher-level academia. Sadly enough, it is common to hear that a student’s personal interests have very little connection to their education, and I had began down this route.

A black hole’s killing horizon, 19th-century Germanic art, Quantum computing, violent high-cinema, Objectivism, British monarch tabloids and cold-war science-fiction-conspiracy are not beneficial to a cost-capital analysis or brand marketing. I won’t preach some form of anarchistic freedom in a Liberal Arts education, there is no way all of these things could form a structured undergraduate degree (and I’m glad they don’t). The Liberal Studies program has allowed me to tackle my superfluous curiosity, without faculty dissuasion, but practical guidance.

I have found my individual academic strengths and weaknesses in unforeseen places over the years. I couldn’t have ever imagined myself, as I am today, in 2012. No longer defeated by institutional specialization, I have the breathing room to innovate and act creatively while enhancing practical methods of research, inquiry, and analysis.

 


 

“If they can get you asking the wrong questions, they don’t have to worry about answers.” – Thomas Pynchon, Gravity’s Rainbows.